Interior tileset


#41

Thanks :slight_smile:

Here is a new tile variant with a fireplace I’m working on (wip) :

Still some work to do on the junction with the ceiling, and of course a new burning logs placeable to match this fireplace…


#42

The design of the fireplace is very good I love the chunkiness of the model. I am not sure if matches the humbleness of its surroundings in terms of scale.

Does it recess into the wall. It is hard to tell from the picture. It would be a very good thing if it does.

PJ


#43

I think in medieval times, the scale of the fireplace was not necessarily related to its owner’s wealth, which was more indicated by the materials used (carved stone for castles and manors, wood and daub for modest houses, for example).
And yes, it recesses into the wall :slight_smile:


#44

I confirm : in france poor regions, people had huge fireplaces, where they could sit in when the weather was cold.


#45

The same could be said of the fireplaces in Upper Bavaria, Germany. At least 15th thru 17th century farm homes.:grinning:


#46

I made a tile variant with a corner fireplace :

And here is the new burning logs placeable :


#47

I know my Multi-Floor request was a little bold… But can you add some variants that break up the “Square” shape of rooms?

Maybe walls that jutt in or something? Beautiful Fireplace <3


#48

Placeable versions of the tileset wall and pillar should do the trick of letting people making most shapes.


#49

Everyone likes their own. I personally like!


#50

I know my Multi-Floor request was a little bold… But can you add some variants that break up the “Square” shape of rooms?

The tile variants I like for creating unique and interesting areas are the quarter-circle and the quarter-hexagon corners (WWWX and WWWC). They are both useful for tower-shaped areas, for example. The circle I create by temporarily relocating the tile model with the open corner at the origin, lining up a round horizontal surface with the tile base, then extruding it vertically and resizing to fit the changing profile.


#51

Yes, I plan to make some walls (one for each material, plaster, brick and wood) and a pillar placeables. And the quarter-hexagon tile should be doable (I’m not so sure about the quarter-circle one, though…).

Meanwhile, the stairs-up tile :


#52

True, a circular wall using wood beams probably wouldn’t look very natural.


#53

This shot looks as cool as the others. I also especially liked the lit window image you put into FL’s post.

It the figure at a 1,1,1 scale or is it a halfling/drow? If not the banisters and posts look very heavy set and the stairs almost knee high. Is it just me? I already got the comment on the scale of the fireplace wrong :frowning:

KR

PJ


#54

It’s a drow, so the stairs may look a little too high.

Here’s a picture with a normal-sized human :


#55

I normally try to follow the rise/run ratio of the standard tilesets when I build tile stairs. Those do look a bit steep. :slight_smile: But maybe that variant is useful for keeping the stairway compact?


#56

I slightly modified the banister tilt, so it looks a little less steep :

It seems to me that the slope of the stairs is correct ?

I personally don’t like the standard tileset stairs, which, in my opinion, are looking more like a ramp (and it’s indeed taking a lot of space). This one is more compact, and maybe more realistic ?

On a side note, this is a first draft I made for this staircase :

It quickly proved to be too large and rickety, even for this modest interior tileset :slight_smile:


#57

The scaling seems slightly off… The Rise of the steps and the railing height seem a little too big when you use the human as scaling.

Not sure… hmm


#58

Stairs up has long been a difficult tile to manage. I really like the open step design you’ve done with the turn but I can see how this might dominate a room.

Is it possible in the space to have the stairs flush to the wall? Also, why not drop the stair altogether as a tile element. Have the elevated door and a series of stair placeables to allow much more flexibility?

PJ


#59

With integrated stairs you can work the walk mesh so that it makes relatively efficient use of the available mesh faces. Inserting a placeable will tend use up more of the walk mesh and make it less likely to bake. Plus you don’t need to futz around with it as much.


#60

Yes, as rj said, integrated stairs are more easy to use for builders. And there are already plenty of stairs and doors placeables to make a custom staircase.

I modified the mesh, so the stairs slope is less steep, and lowered the banister (and retextured the whole model) :

It seems to be now correctly scaled.